New 2018 Laws Bring Major Changes to The Workplace (Find Out If You Will Be Affected!)
The workplace culture is changing rapidly every year. Not long ago, we used to walk from office to office to meet all coworkers.
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On behalf of Rager Law Firm posted on December 16, 2017
New 2018 Laws Bring Major Changes to The Workplace (Find Out If You Will Be Affected!)

The workplace culture is changing rapidly every year. Not long ago, we used to walk from office to office to meet all coworkers. In the year 2017, we use Twitter for that (and rarely leave our cubicle to interact socially with colleagues).

Just recently, it was socially unacceptable – and in some states even illegal! – for women to wear anything other than a skirt, button-down blouse and high heels. In the year 2017, women wear jeans and sneakers to work.

The workplace culture and employment laws that apply to employees and employers in Los Angeles, Pasadena and elsewhere in California have changed dramatically over the past few years.

Well, 2018 brings major changes to the workplaces, again.

As we’re standing on the doorstep of the holiday season, our employment law attorney Jeffrey Rager has reviewed new 2018 employment laws that will have a huge impact on California businesses and employees in the coming year.

New 2018 laws #1: Parental leave

If you’re employed at a company with 20 or more employees, you will be entitled to up to 12 weeks of unpaid, job-protected leave to bond with a newborn child.

The new employment law in Los Angeles– named the New Parent Leave Act – allows eligible employees to take parental leave within 12 months since the child’s birth, adoption or foster care placement.

Our employment law attorneys note that the new 2018 legislation is only intended for baby bonding. Under the New Parent Leave Act, employees will not be able to take leave for other reasons (for example, caring for a sick family member).

The new law is going to have a major impact on businesses with 20 to 49 employees who are currently (until January 1, 2018) not required to provide parental leave to employees under the federal Family and Medical Leave Act or the state California Family Rights Act.

Jeffrey Rager, the founder of Rager Offices Law, a Los Angeles-based law firm that helps clients across California to take legal action against employers who violate their employee rights, reminds Californian residents that they are covered by the state’s disability insurance (SDI) program and the Paid Family Leave (PFL) program, which provide employees that are unable to perform their duties due to pregnancy or childbirth with paid maternity leave for up to 6 weeks.

Find out more about the programs by contacting our employment law attorneys at 310-527-6994.

New 2018 employment laws in California: #2 and #3

New 2018 legislation, signed just a few months ago, is also aimed to bring huge changes to job interview standards.

Under the new laws, which come into effect on Jan. 1, 2018, it will be illegal for employers with five or more employers to ask job applicants about their criminal history information or relying on that information if the candidate’s prior criminal offense(s) have no relation to his/her duties at the company.

Under the new law, Californian employers will be allowed to inquire about and consider criminal history only after a conditional offer of employment has been made.

Another bill, AB 168, also prohibits employers from asking about a job applicant’s salary history. The so-called salary history ban prohibits employers from relying on job applicants’ prior history, compensation or benefits. Also, employers will be required to provide applicants with the pay scale for a given position upon request.

The new law is aimed to destroy the gender pay gap and make the employment process fairer for both male and female employees in Los Angeles, Pasadena and elsewhere in California.

The three new laws will go into effect on January 1, 2018, which means if your employer with more than 20 employees refuses to provide you with parental leave, or your potential employer starts asking about your criminal or salary history during the job interview, contact an employment law attorney immediately.

Consult ourexperienced attorneys in Los Angeles and elsewhere across California by calling Rager Offices Law at 310-527-6994 or fill out this contact form for a free case evaluation.

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